Life Expectancy with Cerebral Palsy

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When someone you know and love gets diagnosed with Cerebral Palsy many different questions will cross your mind. Usually, one of the most asked questions after the initial panic and fear is what is the life expectancy with the disease? Unfortunately, there is no black and white answer to this. It’s all dependent on many variables such as severity, genetics and other environmental factors that may occur.

Cerebral Palsy does not get worse.

The short answer is that: Cerebral Palsy, the disease itself, does not progress. Since it is from an injury to the brain, it is a one-time thing. What does get worse or what can progress, are the issues or “co-mitigating factors”. These are conditions or other health risks that stem from when someone receives as CP diagnosis. Such as mobility problems or other physical impairments.

When your child or someone you love becomes diagnosed with cerebral palsy, the main focus of the doctors, specialists, and even parents are to minimize the risk factors. It is very important to be able to fulfill and exceed the needs of the loved one daily. A big part of fulfilling the needs of each person is to record, track, and observe how the condition continues to progress. Whether it is stagnant or getting worse.

It is important to remember that every case is unique. Every individual will be different regarding changes. Which is why it’s extremely important to do your due diligence and take the necessary steps and precautions that doctors and specialists recommend.   This will ensure that the individual in question will be able to live a full and healthy life. Remember, it is important to prioritize all treatments and steps to the individual and not the condition itself

Always talk to your doctor or specialist about life expectancy.

It is a pretty straightforward approach. But the surest way to come up with a good measure for life expectancy, is to talk to your doctor. Doctor’s and specialist will be able to truly understand each patients individual needs. Since each person can is different in every single way, each case comes with its own challenges. To have the closest estimate you will need to really understand everything about the individual and what that means regarding this disability.

While life expectancy is a concern when you receive the diagnosis, the average mortality rate has gone way down in the past few years. This is a result of advancements in both technology and understanding of this condition. With a greater understanding from both doctors, patients and parents the disability is being approached with new tactics and information.